Diabetes Facts

Diabetes Facts

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body is unable to properly control the amount of sugar in the blood. The body cannot control the sugar in the blood due to the lack of the hormone insulin. Diabetes has long reaching and wide ranging health affects for those that suffer from it. Diabetes significantly raises the risk of heart disease and stroke, blindness and kidney failure. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to death.

It is estimated that over 18 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and of these 18 million it is estimated that nearly one third are unaware they suffer from it.

Diabetes is easily diagnosed using a fasting blood glucose test. This if the most accurate test available. A fasting blood glucose result of 126 or higher indicates diabetes. Generally a fasting glucose test is part of an annual physical for adults.

Type 1 diabetes, or juvenile diabetes, is diagnosed in children and young adults.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and is usually found in adults over the age of 40. Type 2 diabetes is most likely due to poor diet and overweight as 80% of those with Type 2 diabetes are overweight.

There is still debate about the genetics of diabetes. If both your parents have diabetes of course your risk is higher than if one parent has it. There are also environmental triggers to diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is more closely linked to genetic factors and factors such as poor diet and lack of exercise.

Some of the symptoms of diabetes are unexplained weight loss, lethargy, excessive thirst or excessive hunger, frequent urination, dry skin, slow healing sores, sudden vision changes.

If you find you have diabetes you will need to work very closely with your health care provider in order to keep your sugar levels within acceptable ranges. You’ll start testing your blood sugar at least once a day and keeping the results in a diary. You will need to re-vamp your diet and pay close attention to portion size and meal frequency. A diabetic diet doesn’t necessarily mean you cannot have foods that contain carbohydrates, it means you can’t have them in an unlimited fashion. Exercise done on a regular basis has been found to help control blood sugar levels. It is suggested that those with diabetes should exercise 30 to 60 minutes a day.

Living with diabetes can seem overwhelming at first, and it will take commitment on your part. However, millions of Americans live full and active lives with diabetes.

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

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The number of people around the world suffering from diabetes has skyrocketed in the last two decades, from 30 million to 230 million, claiming millions of lives and severely taxing the ability of health care systemsto deal with the epidemic, according to data released Saturday by the International Diabetes Federation.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease in which your body cannot properly store and use fuel for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as breads, cereals, pasta, rice, potatoes, fruits and some vegetables. To use glucose, your body needs insulin. Insulin is made by a gland in your body called the pancreas. There are three types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes only occurs during pregnancy.

Types of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous clinical disorder with numerous causes. Two main classifications of diabetes mellitus exist, idiopathic and secondary.

Idiopathic diabetes is divided into two main types; insulin dependent and non-insulin-depenedent. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, IDDM (Type 1) is defined by the development of ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. Type 1 diabetes most often manifests in childhood (hence also called juvenile onset diabetes) and is the result of an autoimmune destruction of the b-cells of the pancreas. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM (Type 2) is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia but rarely leads to ketoacidosis. Type 2 diabetes generally manifests after age 40 and therefore has the obsolete name of adult onset-type diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can result from genetics defects that cause both insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. There are two main forms of type 2 diabetes:

1. Late onset associated with obesity.
2. Late onset not associated with obesity.

Sample meal plan

Choose foods you like and which satisfy you, and include carbohydrate foods in each meal or snack to help manage blood glucose levels. You can eat your main meal at lunch or dinner.

Get help immediately if Diabetes symptoms occur

Occasionally, the onset of diabetes – particularly Type 1 – can be abrupt. It can lead to a condition called ‘keto acidosis’, which is a medical emergency. The symptoms of this condition are loss of appetite, weight loss, vomiting, excessive passing of urine, altered consciousness and, finally, coma. Seek medical help immediately if these symptoms occur.

What Is Physiotherapy?

What Is Physiotherapy?

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If you have a musculo-skeletal problem or injury, you might be given a referral to a physiotherapy clinic.
If you have gone to one before, you know what to expect. If you are new to this service, you might ask, what is physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy is also known as physical therapy. That answers the question of what is physiotherapy for many people. However, if you have not had any dealings with this form of treatment, you need to know more.

A type of health care, physiotherapy concerns itself with providing physical healing methods for many different kinds of injuries and illnesses. Some of these techniques are done in a hands-on manner, by using massage or manipulation of the musculo-skeletal system. Knowing what is physiotherapy is crucial to getting this kind of help.

Education is a part of what is physiotherapy. A physiotherapist will teach a patient how to care for their injuries. He will teach exercises to do at home so that therapy can continue beyond the walls of the clinic or hospital. He will teach ways to overcome difficulties that cannot be cured.

Another part of what is physiotherapy is rehabilitation. Patients have injuries from sports, car accidents, or assault. These injuries can be treated through physiotherapy. Given the right treatments and an injury that will respond to treatment, much progress can be made. Full functioning may be regained. It may even be possible for them to go back to work rather than being laid up at home.

An answer to what is physiotherapy is what kinds of treatments physiotherapists use. Heat, ice, and ultrasound are used to relieve pain and stiffness. Massage, chiropractic, and other hands-on methods are important. All these methods tend to promote better health, both physical and psychological.

Equipment for helping patients regain their strength and mobility are a part of what is physiotherapy. This equipment may allow a person who is partially paralyzed to get the most exercise possible. This is crucial in maintaining the integrity of their spines and muscles.

What is physiotherapy? It is a carefully planned and executed treatment strategy. It is based upon assessments of the conditions that patients suffer. If all goes well, the patient will return to their original condition. If this is not possible, the goal is for the patient to reach a goal that is the best movement and lack of pain that is possible.

People who are referred to a clinic may ask, what is physiotherapy? However, they will be given quick answers to this question. After an initial evaluation, they will be scheduled for treatments like ultrasound or acupuncture. They will be assigned exercises to do at home. A good physiotherapist will begin treatment right away.

People, who ask what is physiotherapy, often do not consider the preventative side of the field. It is a part of the work of practitioners of physiotherapy to encourage exercises and postures that will help patients avoid physical injuries and conditions requiring their services. An excellent physiotherapist will have fewer return patients, but the flow of people needing physiotherapy continues.

Diabetes Symptoms- Knowing the Types of Diabetes

Diabetes Symptoms- Knowing the Types of Diabetes

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Diabetes is a condition featuring unusually high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Insulin, produced by the pancreas, is used by the body to lower blood glucose levels. If someone’s pancreas doesn’t generate enough insulin, their body will develop diabetes.

A short list of symptoms of diabetes would include severe hunger and thirst, more urge to urinate, and fatigue. But the surest way of knowing whether you have diabetes is having a blood sugar test, also known as a Glucose Tolerance Test.

Type 1 diabetes is the more acute form. It is typically treated with special dietary restrictions, exercise and occasionally with insulin. Type 1 diabetes usually will be treated with special diet, exercise, and a weight loss plan before insulin is added. This form of diabetes is considered an insulin dependent disease.

A less severe form of diabetes, Type 2 diabetes is first treated with a diabetic diet,
exercise and weight loss. If theses measures are not successful in controlling blood sugar and insulin levels, oral medications may be added. Insulin is then finally considered if these also are unsuccessful. Type 2 diabetes normally occurs in adults who are middle age or older, which is why it is sometimes called Late-Onset Diabetes In this case, he pancreas still produces the right levels of insulin but the body has become resistant to it.

It is feasible to delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes if it runs in the family. Through losing weight, getting the right amount of exercise and controlling your diet, you can manage. If Type 2 diabetes is not treated, eventually the same complications may ensue as those seen with Type 1 diabetes.

Gestational diabetes is seen in pregnant women. Normally it disappears after the birth of the baby, however, treatment for the mother to stabilize the blood glucose levels will decrease the chance of complications to the baby as well as mother.

Juvenile Onset diabetes is another major form of diabetes that affects many children. It is believed to be the onset of Type 1 diabetes. If a child is showing even a few of the symptoms of diabetes, it’s vital that they be checked by a doctor. It is estimated that over two million adolescents are in the pre-diabetes stage. This is mostly due to being overweight. In this condition, blood glucose levels are high but not high enough to be considered diabetes. Teens usually develop this between the ages of 12 and 19.

Think You May Have Diabetes?

Think You May Have Diabetes?

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not properly control the amount of sugar in the blood stream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood is too high. This disease occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or does not use it properly.

The symptoms of diabetes should be recognized. Recognizing a symptom or sign for diabetes is important – diabetes can be life-threatening. Diabetes can be caused by too little insulin in the body or by the inability to utilize the insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas which regulates blood sugar levels. Over 15 million people the US alone suffer from diabetes.

The main types of diabetes are:

Type 1 diabetes (often called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes) – is a chronic (lifelong) disease that occurs when the pancreas produces too little insulin to regulate blood sugar levels appropriately.

Type 2 diabetes (often called adult or non-insulin-dependent diabetes) – is the most common form of diabetes. About 90 to 95 percent of people who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but either not produce enough insulin or their bodies do not utilize the insulin made. Most of the people who have this type of diabetes are overweight.

Gestational Diabetes – is high blood glucose that develops during pregnancy in a woman.

How would you know if you might have diabetes?

The most common symptoms of diabetes include – fatigue, increased appetite, increased thirst, blurred vision, frequent urination, slow healing infections and even impotence in adult males.

By exhibiting any of these signs does not necessarily mean you have diabetes though. The best way to determine this is to visit your doctor and request the fasting blood glucose level test. Diabetes is diagnosed if this test shows the blood glucose level is higher than 126 mg/dl on two different tests.

There is no cure for diabetes at the moment, so what should one do if diagnosed with diabetes? The objectives are to keep your blood sugars stabilized as much as possible. By maintaining a balanced blood sugar level, you can eliminate any possibility of immediate or semi-immediate problems – in turn… prolonging ones life.

Remember, life doesn’t stop because you have diabetes; it merely becomes more of a challenge. The good news on the other hand is the cure for diabetes may not be that far off. Until then, keep your blood sugars regulated, eat right and exercise daily.

Diabetes–What You Need to Know About This Hidden Danger

Diabetes–What You Need to Know About This Hidden Danger

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Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (sugar) for our bodies to burn to create energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, produces a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes large amounts of sugar to build up in your blood.
The actual cause of diabetes continues to be a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity appear to play major roles. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. According to the Center for Disease Control, diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. As of 2002, 18.2 million people in the U.S.–6.3 percent of the population–had diabetes, with 1.3 million new cases being diagnosed each year. The National Institutes of Health also estimate that an additional 5.2 million people have diabetes without actually being aware of it.
There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which was previously called insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile-onset diabetes, accounts for about 10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, which was called non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes, accounts for the remaining 90%. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that only pregnant women get. If not treated, it can cause problems for both the baby and the mother. Gestational diabetes develops in 2% to 5% of all pregnancies, but usually disappears when the pregnancy is over.
Diabetes is a serious disease and phrases such as “a touch of diabetes” or “your blood sugar is a little high” tend to dismiss the fact that diabetes is a major killer of Americans. In addition to the lives that are lost, diabetes has a tremendous economic impact in the United States. The National Diabetes Education Program estimates the cost of diabetes in 2002 was $132 billion. Of this amount, $92 billion was due to direct medical costs and $40 billion due to indirect costs such as lost workdays, restricted activity, and disability due to diabetes. The average medical expenditure for a person with diabetes was $13,243, or 5.2 times greater than the cost for a person without diabetes. In addition, 11 percent of national health care expenditures went to diabetes care.
In response to this growing health burden of diabetes, the diabetes community has three choices: prevent diabetes; cure diabetes; and improve the quality of care of people with diabetes to prevent devastating complications. All three approaches are being actively pursued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Many government agencies, at all levels, are involved in educational campaigns in an attempt to prevent diabetes, especially type 2. Several approaches to “cure” diabetes are also being pursued: pancreas transplantation, islet cell transplantation (islet cells in the pancreas produce insulin), the development of an artificial pancreas, and genetic manipulation where fat or muscle cells that do not normally make insulin have a human insulin gene inserted and are then transplanted into people with type 1 diabetes.
While there is yet no cure for diabetes, healthy eating, physical activity, and insulin injections are the basic therapies for type 1 diabetes. For those with type 2 diabetes, treatment includes healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Many people with type 2 may require oral medication to control their glucose levels. People with diabetes must take personal responsibility for their day-to-day care, and keep blood glucose levels from going too low or too high. The key to living a long and healthy life with diabetes is to learn about the disease, exercise daily, follow a diabetes food plan (right portions of healthy foods, less salt and fat), stop smoking, take prescribed medications, get routine medical care, brush your teeth and floss every day, monitor your blood glucose the way the doctor tells you to and remain positive. Using the correct routines, thousands of people with diabetes have lived long, happy and productive lives.

Types of Diabetes

Types of Diabetes

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Before we start discussion about type of diabetes we must know what exactly is diabetes?
Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the digestion system of our body for growth and energy. Almost every food we eat broken down to glucose, the form or sugar which is the fuel for our body.
After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.
When we eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into our cells. For the people having diabetes this is the place of disorder, there pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced.
Types of diabetes: The three main types of diabetes are
Type 1 diabetes
Type 2 diabetes
Gestational diabetes
Type 1 Diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes)
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease results when the body’s system for fighting infection stops in a part of body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live.
Type 2 Diabetes (previously known as non-insulin dependent diabetes)
The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes. Nearly 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2. This form of diabetes is strongly genetic. About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight.
Type 2 diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents. However, type 2 diabetes in youth are not in common.
When type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the pancreas is usually producing enough insulin, but for unknown reasons, the body cannot use the insulin effectively, a condition called insulin resistance.
After several years, insulin production decreases. The result is the same as for type 1 diabetes—glucose builds up in the blood and the body cannot make efficient use of its main source of fuel.
Gestational Diabetes: (Gdm)
Gestational diabetes develops only during pregnancy. Like type 2 diabetes, it occurs more often in African Americans, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, and among women with a family history of diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 20 to 50 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes within 5 to 10 years.

All About Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Types.

All About Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Types.

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While talking about diabetes, you may be frightened from the idea that you may have it. Or maybe, you may have it in the future. You want to know if you are at risk to develop diabetes and anxiously you’re looking to find if you have any diabetes symptom.

Diabetes affects the manner in which the body handles carbohydrates, fats and proteins. If neglected, diabetes can have serious complications. The diabetic people have high blood sugar level. The blood sugar level is regulated by insulin – a hormone produced by the pancreas, which depends on your eating habits.

Diabetes is a serious disease. But the startling truth is that diabetes is reversible. Diabetes is the number one cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This disease is a condition where the body is unable to automatically regulate blood glucose levels, resulting in too much glucose (a sugar) in the blood. Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects as many as 16 million Americans.

Actually, there is no clear symptom for diabetes. The most common symptoms of diabetes are as follow:

– being all the time thirsty
– frequent urination
– increased hunger
– feeling all the time tired; having an excessive fatigue,

On the other hand, there are some other symptoms of diabetes that are prescribed as diabetes complications in fact. These symptoms are:

– vision changes;
– recurrent skin infections very difficult to heal;
– tingling or numbness you may feel in your extremities;
– gums disorders;
– Hair loss and many others.

There are two different types of diabetes.

Type I Diabetes (juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes): The reason for type I diabetes is due to pancreas unability to produce insulin.

Type II Diabetes (non insulin dependent diabetes or adult onset diabetes): This diabetes is a result of body tissues becoming resistant to insulin. It is usually hereditary.

Type 2 Diabetes is more common than Type 1 Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a life-long disease marked by high levels of sugar in the blood. Conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. Type 2 diabetes may account for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Up to two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Obesity is the single most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. An estimated 20% of all cases of new onset type 2 diabetes are in individuals between the ages of 9-19. The more you know about type 2 diabetes, the more you’ll be able to take the right steps to take control of your condition.

If neglected, diabetes can lead to various complications such as damage to the kidneys, heart disease, nerve damage, hypoglycemia (drastic reduction in glucose levels). Diabetes is a serious disease and there is no treatment of it. However, it can be brought under control by proper diabet diet.

Case Studies are Critical for Succeeding in Business Studies

Case Studies are Critical for Succeeding in Business Studies

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Business studies theory incorporates an incredible variety of topics.
Broadly divided into marketing, finance, human relations, strategy, operations, and environment, business studies theory is often difficult to master. Whether you’re delving into a broad topic like marketing theory or a highly specialised field like stock valuation and depreciation, it’s helpful to examine case studies. In looking at how actual businesses tackled a problem, you can more quickly learn how business studies theory applies to the real world. This can help you enormously when you are sitting for your Business Studies GCSEs, AS or A Levels.

Here are three examples of actual case studies that are available on the Web as a free educational resource:

1. Embracing Change

To illustrate the need for organisations to adapt to shifts in the business environment, one case study examines Aegon, a global insurance and pensions company. Aegon needed to combine its own strengths with those of its subsidiary brands in order to increase its visibility within the UK. By examining the external factors influencing change, the reasons for change, the process of creating a new organisational culture, and the steps needed to implement change, this case study illustrates the complete cycle involved in one company’s quest to achieve a greater market presence.

2. Corporate Social Responsibility

Consumers are increasingly choosing to patronize companies that demonstrate a high degree of social responsibility through improving the lives of their workers, their communities, and ultimately, the world. Among the case studies offered as a free educational resource is a case study on Amway, a worldwide direct sales organization, and the way the company partnered with UNICEF, the global advocate for children. The case study looks at the issue of corporate growth and responsibility, how Amway developed a strategy for implementing a programme, the process of identifying stakeholders, and the elements involved in ensuring that the corporate social responsibility strategy was in alignment with the company’s business objectives. In the process, the company was able to strengthen its already sterling reputation.

3. Flexible Working Patterns

The changing face of the workforce means that today’s organisations need to adapt to the needs of their employees. A case study of the Audit Commission illustrates how developing flexible work practices can both improve a company’s services and meet the needs of its staff. A review of it business activity identified three groups of jobs within the organisation, as well as the types of workers they employed. It then outlines the three types of flexibility needed to optimise the productivity of their workforce, and covers the benefits and challenges of managing a flexible workforce. The process of examining a workforce and workforce practices via a case study is an excellent way to understand business studies theory.

There are many other types of case studies that support business studies theory, such as those involving the creation of quality standards, the role of market research, how deregulation can support the growth of a company, and how business planning can support key performance indicators as measures of success. Best of all, they’re all available as a free educational resource.